The Hook Grip: Do you need it?

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There is a two-point answer to this question. It is good practice to keep the hook grip whenever snatching or cleaning a weight. However, very rarely, it may not be the best choice.

Touch-and-Go

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Touch-and-go has brought a new dimension to Olympic lifting. Many times the weight is light enough for the athlete to control easily and the focus is on speed. The three factors we will look at while addressing this issue are efficiency, speed and technique.

Back Rounding

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Many Olympic lifts are made or missed the moment the bar separates from the floor. During this initial pull from the ground, it is crucial that the back stays completely flat and the lifter keeps a slight arch in their lower back.

Finishing the Pull

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Many Crossfitters and Olympic weightlifters constantly hear the term “finish your pull” from their coaches. But what are their coaches really trying to tell them?

Joint by Joint: Feet and Ankles

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Being injured so much has instilled in me the importance of injury prevention, paying attention to my body and being thorough when it comes to body maintenance. The sheer volume of my injuries may indicate that I am the last person to listen to when it comes to injury prevention. However, following each of my recent injuries, I researched how to prevent future injury in those same areas.

Carbohydrate Timing for Optimal Body Composition

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Eating carbohydrates at the right time during the day is the most effective way to shed unwanted body fat and insure adequate energy for exercise. Deciding when to eat carbohydrates is simple: only eat large doses of carbohydrates after you workout! The science behind this idea makes perfect sense, and not doing this is a common mistake made by a very large percentage of our population.

Train Smarter Not Harder

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The current way of thinking in sports and in much of the working world is to just “work harder.” A great work ethic is a requirement if you want to be “great” or “the best” at something. With that said, many times this idea of “just work harder” causes diminishing returns in terms of performance and productivity.

Mental Game

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The mental game of sport and competition is often even more important than the physical. For example, I know several Crossfit athletes that have tremendous numbers when they are in their own gym on their own time.